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Zika Virus Health Advisory – UPDATE

Zika Virus

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The Florida Department of Health has identified an area in Miami where Zika is being spread by mosquitoes. This guidance is for people who live in or traveled to this area any time after June 15 (based on the earliest time symptoms can start and the maximum 2-week incubation period for Zika virus)

  • Women with Zika virus disease should wait at least eight weeks and men with Zika virus disease should wait at least six months after symptom onset to attempt conception.
  • Women and men with ongoing risk of possible Zika virus exposure who do not have signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease and are considering pregnancy should consult their healthcare provider. Due to the ongoing risk of possible Zika virus exposure, healthcare providers should discuss the risks of Zika, emphasize ways to prevent Zika virus infection, and provide information about safe and effective contraceptive methods. As part of their pregnancy planning and counseling with their health care providers, some women and their partners living in the area with active Zika virus transmission identified by the FL DOH might decide to delay pregnancy.
  • Women and men with limited risk and who do not report signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease should wait at least eight weeks after last possible exposure to attempt conception.

This is an ongoing investigation, and CDC is rapidly learning more about the extent of active Zika virus transmission in the area identified by the FL DOH. Click here to read the full recommendations from the CDC. As more information becomes available, we will update these recommendations.

Click here for tips to prevent mosquito bites.

If you’re trying to have a baby and would like to learn more about GENESIS Fertility or are ready to schedule an appointment, please speak with one of our New Patient Specialists at 718-283-8600

 

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